Wednesday, June 13, 2012

On Biblical Governance

"You render unto Caesar what is Caesar's
And render unto God what is for God."
If money's made by government, it's theirs --
And thus to anarchy came Jesus' nod.

"Thou shall not covet" and "Thou shall not steal."
How can a moral government then tax?
How can it give away that money, how
Can Christians think it's right, their morals lax?

You are not generous with what's not yours --
A Christian cannot outsource duty to
Care for the poor. Did Jesus come to say,
"The government will save, for it is true"?

The government of God was anarchy --
A common law with judges. Isreal sings
They want a king, and God in weariness,
With wit, then punished them by giving kings.

And we are punished still with all their lies,
Enslaving ways and constant theft. We live
So that we can support them and pretend
Without them we would die and never give.

It's time that we returned to Biblical
True governance so that we can be free --
No government to deify mere man,
No legislation -- back to anarchy.

7 comments:

  1. Stephanie HermanJune 13, 2012 at 8:37 AM

    Reading those Old Testament stories led me to the same conclusion... just recently!

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  2. "Both riches and honor come from You, and You rule over all, and in Your hand is power and might; and it lies in Your hand to make great and to strengthen everyone. - 1 Chronicles 29:12

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  3. Is not God in the beggar and the king? ("we" - including the beggar and the king - and come to think of it the ISIS beheader!! - live and move and have our being in Him. For after all, He sends His rain down on the just and the unjust)

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  4. Indeed, God is in us all and we all, together, evolve toward God. One can also see God's real relation to us in Job. But we are not supposed to have anyone above us in authority.

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  5. This may interest you because it sheds some light on what you are discussing: http://graceandknowledge.faithweb.com/deut17.html. This is a strong idea even in Aristotle, the idea of a "servant king". Aristotle wrote that in order to be a great leader, you must learn to follow. Israel's original human kings, to fulfill their duties as king, were supposed to rule by bringing the people closer to God. Nietzsche wrote that "to ascend you must descend"-- this also bears this wisdom.

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  6. The original "rulers" of the Israelites were "judges" rather than kings. The judges seemed to perform the role of common law judges, and they interpreted the law that emerged from the people/God. But then the Israelites demanded a king. God warned them what would happen if they got a king, then punished them for wanting a king by giving them a king.

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I appreciate all constructive comments.